Stokes Wagner Law Firm
Stokes Wagner

On August 11, 2021, the Los Angeles City Council voted to instruct City Attorney Mike Feuer to draft an ordinance that requires customers to show proof of receiving at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine prior to entering indoor public spaces. The ordinance would apply to restaurants, bars, retail stores, fitness centers, spas and entertainment facilities such as stadiums, concert venues and movie theatres.

Read More...


On August 2, 2021, the City Council of West Hollywood approved a Hotel Worker Ordinance, which establishes additional protections for hotel workers in the City of West Hollywood. The ordinance includes provisions on the use of personal security devices, workload limitations based on square footage, right to recall, and hotel worker retention. The ordinance also includes novel provisions such as the creation of a “Public Housekeeping Training Organization” and financial hardship waivers.

Read More...


The Affordable Care Act requires covered employers to report that they offered minimum essential coverage to their employees by filing IRS Forms 1094-C and 1095-C. Until recently, the IRS offered “good-faith transition relief,” which allowed businesses to avoid penalties related to the submission of incorrect or incomplete information in Form 1094-C and 1095-C filings, including missing or incorrect Taxpayer Identification Numbers (TINs), dates of birth, and other vital information. Under that policy, a business that submitted forms containing any incorrect or incomplete information could avoid penalties simply by demonstrating to the IRS that it had made a “good-faith” effort to comply with ACA regulations when furnishing the forms to individuals and filing with the IRS.

Read More...


As California and the U.S. enjoy a surge in the travel industry again, the newly codified Labor Code section 2810.8 sets forth the obligations of California employers with regard to the recall of laid-off employees in many hospitality positions. The new law took effect on April 16, 2021 and expires on December 31, 2024.

Read More...


Amid trends of increased community transmission of COVID-19, at least 17 counties across California are now recommending residents wear face-coverings in indoor public spaces. However, only Los Angeles County has mandated the use of face-coverings indoors for everyone. Similarly, the City of Pasadena announced via Twitter that the Pasadena Public Health Department will be issuing an order requiring face masks indoors regardless of vaccination status in public settings and businesses. Details of the Pasadena order are expected to be published later this week.

Read More...


On July 15, 2021, The Supreme Court of California published its opinion on Ferra v. Loews Hollywood Hotel, LLC and reversed the appellate court’s decision.

Read More...


On July 9, 2021, President Biden issued his Executive Order directing federal agencies to implement seventy-two different initiatives intended to promote competition across the American economy. Ideally, these initiatives will spur economic growth and recovery. Critical for employers, President Biden’s “Executive Order on Promoting Competition in the American Economy” seeks to ban or limit the ability of employers to use non-compete agreements in order to make it easier to change jobs and raise wages. Although the executive order does not render non-compete provisions illegal, employers should take particular caution in deciding whether a non-compete provision is necessary to protect their business interests moving forward.

Read More...


Unionized employers in Illinois may have a useful defense to expensive employee BIPA lawsuits: the management rights clause and federal preemption law. A grievance might be a lot cheaper than a lawsuit.

Read More...


On June 17, 2021, the Cal-OSHA Board voted 5-1 to adopt its proposed revisions to its Emergency Temporary Standards (ETS), which much more closely align with the CDC guidance. That same day, Governor Gavin Newsom signed an Executive Order enabling these rules to go into effect immediately. The revised ETS, among other things, allows fully vaccinated workers to discontinue mask usage and social distancing.

Read More...


Anyone who has considered filing a petition for writ of mandate from a superior court ruling knows the odds are not in favor of the court granting this extraordinary relief. Apart from clear error, the requirement of showing irreparable harm is a hurdle that derails even the strongest advocates, but some cases present such important questions of law, they warrant a writ. General Atomics v. Superior Court, filed May 28, 2021, was one such case.

Read More...